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At this point all the problems of brick and stone masonry construction had been solved, and, beyond decorative advances, little innovation was achieved until the Industrial Revolution.Not until the 19th century, with the advent of cast-iron and steel construction, did a new architectural age dawn and higher, broader, and lighter buildings become possible.The Chalcolithic (Copper-Stone) Age, lasting in the Aegean area from the early 3rd millennium .The hallmark of the Aegean civilizations was the facility with which Asiatic motifs and techniques were adapted to form original local styles.During the period from the beginning of civilization through ancient Greek culture, construction methods progressed from the most primitive shed roof and simple truss to the vertical posts, or columns, supporting horizontal beams, or lintels ( post-and-lintel system).Greek architecture also formalized many structural and decorative elements into three Classical orders—Ionic, Doric, and Corinthian—which, to a greater or lesser extent, have influenced architecture since that time.

Each is notable, and Phaestus is particularly fascinating, due to extensive Italian excavations.Following the example of such structures, the Palace of Minos is a quadrangular complex of rooms and corridors grouped around a great central court, roughly 175 × 100 feet (50 × 30 metres).At the northern end, toward the sea, a grand portico of 12 pilasters would have given access to the central court.The Romans exploited the arch, vault, and dome and made broader use of the load-bearing masonry wall.In the late medieval period, the pointed arch, ribbing, and pier systems gradually emerged.In architecture, by far the most important achievements were those of the civilizations of Palace of Minos at Knossos, excavated and reconstructed early in the 20th century by Sir Arthur Evans, offers evidence of unbroken architectural and artistic development from Neolithic beginnings, culminating in a brilliant display of building activity during the third phase of the Middle Minoan period (1700–1580 ).

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